Million Dollar Quartet

Last week I saw anoff-Broadway musical, Million Dollar Quartet. It’s about Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and Carl Perkins who on December 4, 1956 for the first and only time play together in the same Sun Records recording studio (hence, “”the million dollar quartet””). The show was at New World Theater in NYC (though Million Dollar Quartet is showing in Chicago and touring the rest of the U.S). It was my first time at New World Theater and I really liked it because the theater seemed more intimate, and it didn’t matter where your seat was since it only allows for a relatively small audience anyway. It was also the perfect stage to hold the eight or so performers who shared the stage for the duration of the show. Because it was a small cast, each actor holds importance and contributes to the dynamic of the group which in turn also allows the audience to really take notice of their individual roles.

I also like that Million Dollar Quartet is only an hour and forty minutes long without an intermission. Sometimes I get a little antsy sitting in longer shows. In addition, there wasn’t a fancy stage or wardrobe changes–the entire show took place on a static stage. But what came from the stage was anything but static. The performers were really great musicians. Going into Million Dollar Quartet, I didn’t have high expectations–I didn’t really have any

expectations–so I was pleasantly surprised that the show was

so good. I thought Eric Stang who plays Jerry Lee Lewis was particularly talented. He could rock out playing the piano with his hands behind his back all while laying on the hood of the piano.

The live music played during Million Dollar Quartet is great and the impersonations are good. You didn’t have to grow up listening to Elvis, Johnny Cash, et al. to enjoy the show even though you are bound to have heard at least a

few of the hit songs played. In a short period of time the audience is brought up to speed on the careers of the rock ‘n’ roll legends.

I’m so glad I got the opportunity to see Million Dollar Quartet and I highly recommend it to everyone. I was really surprised I could be so entertained with a play based on the events that took place in a single night and that didn’t have set changes or elaborate costumes. I also liked how at the end of Million Dollar Quartet they show the original picture ofElvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and Carl Perkins at the studio. It makes the whole show feel more authentic and special as if capturing an incredible moment in time. If you’re looking for a more affordable but equally as fun show, I recommend seeing Million Dollar Quartet off-Broadway. I brought along two friends with varying tastes, and they surprisingly both really liked the musical too, so I think it’s safe to say almost anyone will enjoy Million Dollar Quartet.

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